• American Homebrewing Association Announces Rising Homebrewing Destinations

     
    POSTED November 11, 2016
     

The American Homebrewing Association has recently announced seven rising homebrewing destinations in the US.

“Craft brewing and homebrewing have long supported one another: a thriving craft beer community nurtures a healthy, growing homebrew culture and vice-versa,” says Gary Glass, director, American Homebrewers Association. “Some cities are legendary for such pro-am symbiosis, while others are gaining well-deserved reputations as up-and-coming homebrew hot spots.”

The list includes: Boise, Idaho; Minneapolis; Nashville, Tenn.; Phoenix; Rochester, N.Y.; Tampa, Fla.; and Windsor, Calif.

AHA created the list by evaluating elements like economic impact, proximity to craft breweries, homebrew clubs and membership, competition entries and more. Homebrewing in the US has an economic impact of $1.225 million, and the popularity of continues to rise. About 78 percent of homebrewers have reported increased passion for the industry compared to three years ago.

“No matter where you live, we encourage everyone to try their hand at homebrewing,” says Glass.

Results from the Incentive Research Foundation’s (IRF) 2022 Incentive Travel Destination Preferences & Their Impact on Motivation confirmed that interest in incentive travel as a motivating sales reward is at an all-time high. 91% of 405 survey respondents described group incentive travel as extremely or very motivating compared to 80% last year. Individual incentive travel was rated even higher as a motivational award at 96% versus 84% last year. 

 

Everybody loves to talk about welcoming change. Then change happens, and whew, it’s tough. After the past few years, meetings and events professionals certainly appreciate that feeling, but they’re also feeling energized by so many new ways for attendees to gather. 

 

The corporate world spends an estimated $242 billion on gifts for employees and customers, according to Forbes. Wouldn’t it be rewarding if the purchasing and giving of these types of gifts offered meaningful work for veterans, women, and their children?