• Antlers at Vail’s General Manager Retires

     
    POSTED October 28, 2016
     

Rob LeVine, the general manager of Antlers at Vail, has retired from his 29-year tenure at the hotel. In his honor, they have renamed the conference center after him.

“After all the many wonderful and gratifying experiences that I've enjoyed in the hospitality industry over the years, none outweighs the incredible honor of having the Antlers meeting facility bearing my name,” says LeVine. “Very simply, I am fortunate beyond words.”

Antlers at Vail is the sole place LeVine worked at full time. He began his career there as a front desk clerk more than 38 years ago. In the late 1990s, LeVine led a renovation project that added 24 condominiums and underground parking. He converted the hotel’s fireplaces from wood-burning to gas, which encouraged the entire Valley to follow suit. His latest upgrade to the hotel earned them a platinum lodging ranking.

Magdalena King is set to be Antlers at Vail’s new general manager; she hopes to keep LeVine’s legacy alive and well.

The Hilton Dallas Lincoln Centre completed its $24 million renovation of the entire hotel and conference center. Renovations began in 2020. 

The North Dallas conference center hotel renovation includes a full redesign of all 503 guest rooms, lobby and public areas, and food and beverage outlets. Additionally, the hotel’s 55,000-square-feet of meeting space was updated with new furnishings, technology upgrades, and the addition of a new 6,600-square-foot Lakeside Ballroom. 

 

The Global Business Travel Association and Uber for Business teamed up to conduct ground transportation research and and shared the results in a report titled The Corporate Travel Comeback: The Evolution of Ground Transportation and Other Trending Business Travel Topics. GBTA members and industry stakeholders in the U.S.

 

Anchorage is a city like none other—making it a popular choice for hosting meetings and events.

Through the tall windows of the Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center in Anchorage, meeting attendees can gaze out toward Cook Inlet, which stretches all the way to the Gulf of Alaska and toward mountains—some snow-capped—representing several ranges. They may even see an eagle fly by or see one of the 1,500 moose that are said to roam Alaska’s largest city. It’s easy to see why it’s said that Anchorage is a city like none other in the United States.