• Antlers at Vail Announces New Assistant General Manager

     
    POSTED November 20, 2016
     

Antlers at Vail hired Kim Rediker as the new assistant general manager. Rediker will replace former assistant general manager Magda King, who was promoted to general manager after Rob LeVine’s retirement.

Rediker has lived in Vail since 1992 and has experience working in Vail hospitality at places like Simba Run Resort, the Inn & Suites at Riverwalk and Tivoli Lodge.

“The Antlers’ well-known commitment to premier quality and excellent customer service is embraced by the staff and owners alike,” says Rediker. “I am thrilled to be a part of its ‘the answer is yes, now what is the question?’ culture here. I look forward to a great first winter, meeting our new and returning guests and helping to make their vacations memorable.”

Rediker also serves on the Vail Recreation District Board of Directors and the Town of Vail Commission on Special Events. Additionally, she spent eight years on the Vail Town Council, and two years as Mayor Pro Tem. Her commitment to the community was an attractive quality to Antlers at Vail.

“Kim brings with her an amazing combination of industry knowledge and experience, community involvement and service-oriented attitude that meets every item on our wish list for assistant general manager,” says King. “We feel very lucky to have her join our team, and I have no doubt that our guests will enjoy working with her as much as we already do.”

Results from the Incentive Research Foundation’s (IRF) 2022 Incentive Travel Destination Preferences & Their Impact on Motivation confirmed that interest in incentive travel as a motivating sales reward is at an all-time high. 91% of 405 survey respondents described group incentive travel as extremely or very motivating compared to 80% last year. Individual incentive travel was rated even higher as a motivational award at 96% versus 84% last year. 

 

Everybody loves to talk about welcoming change. Then change happens, and whew, it’s tough. After the past few years, meetings and events professionals certainly appreciate that feeling, but they’re also feeling energized by so many new ways for attendees to gather. 

 

The corporate world spends an estimated $242 billion on gifts for employees and customers, according to Forbes. Wouldn’t it be rewarding if the purchasing and giving of these types of gifts offered meaningful work for veterans, women, and their children?