• Calling All Thrill-Seekers to Thrillz

     
    POSTED April 15, 2020
     
  • Calling All Thrill-Seekers to Thrillz

     
    POSTED April 15, 2020
     

You’ve seen free-fall stunts pulled off in the movies, and now Thrillz entertainment center is inviting you to experience the same exhilarating action firsthand. From 3D climbing walls, 70 feet of zip lines and a giant rotating sweeper, to a 360-degree virtual reality roller coaster and an Indiana Jones-style rolling log, the park offers something for both the young and the young at heart.

For an event like no other, the 70,000-square-foot facility houses a variety of activities that invite guests to experience the sense of free-falling from two-story obstacles onto giant stuntman airbags. Test your mettle on a swinging circus trapeze, or jump and dodge a giant sweeper, all while completely unharnessed and guided by Thrillz team leaders the entire time.

“We knew we had developed a game changing experience,” says co-founder Lisa Cannon. The lack of a harness really captures the feeling of free falling. “A lot of team activities are boring, this really gives you an opportunity to laugh at, or with, each other in a unique bonding experience.”

Lower impact activities include ax-throwing, giant dodgeball and wireless laser tag—a favorite among groups.

Thrillz offers groups a truly unique and rewarding experience. “An engaged workforce is a productive workforce; corporate events enhance synergy in the workplace by placing employees in an environment where they must rely on one another,” says Cannon. Every group event is customizable, providing the option to choose from two or three activities, as well as catering for any of Thrillz’ large meeting and event rooms. Pricing varies on your choice of “fly time,” while other attractions start at a set rate as low as $5 per person.

 

Event planners often prepare for the worst, but one thing they likely didn’t anticipate was a global pandemic when selecting event cancellation insurance policies for their 2020 gatherings. Panicked planners began contacting Marcia McKinney, owner of Northeast Insurance Advisors, in late February and early March, but as meetings and events ground to a halt, they were already out of luck.

“It’s kind of like trying to buy homeowner’s insurance as your house is starting to catch fire... it’s too late,” says McKinney.

 

Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth is one of six recipients of the James Beard Foundation’s 2020 America’s Classics Award, which is given to locally owned restaurants that have timeless appeal and are beloved regionally for quality food that reflects the character of their community. Per the foundation, “Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth, a chicken dinner behemoth positioned between Detroit and Michigan’s summer lake destination, is decidedly on the beaten path. William Zehnder Sr. and his wife, Emilie, bought a former hotel in 1928.

 

In early April Detroit’s TCF Center became a 1,000-bed alternate care site to help ease the burden on local hospitals during the COVID-19 crisis. The 723,000-square-foot facility became the TCF Regional Care Center. According to Pure Michigan’s Michelle Grinnell, who serves as public information officer for the state’s alternate care sites, 39 patients were treated at TCF, the last of whom was discharged on May 7.