• Deskpass Gives Access to a Giant Co-Working Network

     
    FROM THE Spring 2016 ISSUE
     

If your work office is too noisy or your home office is in too much disarray to actually get anything done, there’s an app for that. It’s called Deskpass, from a Chicagobased company called Desktime, and it offers a subscription platform providing an online directory of 25 co-working spaces you can reserve with the tap of a button.

For $199 a month you can have a different workspace every day, or for $99 you can reserve a new space eight days out of the month.

“[Each] commits to giving you a desk, Internet and some coffee. Past that, every space is different,” says Sam Rosen, Deskpass founder. One is located inside a climbing gym. Another, called Nextspace, has phone booths. Locations are currently available in River North, West Loop, Central Loop, Lakeview, Gold Coast/ Old Town, Wicker Park, Logan Square, Ravenswood, Wilmette, Glenview and Gurnee, and new locations are in the works.

With meetings returning to normal as the COVID-19 pandemic levels out, outdoor mountain pursuits are finding more time on meeting agendas. Taking events outdoors not only boosts attendees’ comfort level as they ease back into in-person meetings, time spent in nature is proven to improve brain health and stimulate creative thinking as well.

We’ll be looking at this topic in-depth in the Spring/Summer 2022 issue of Mountain Meetings. Consider this as an introduction to some of the possibilities.  

 

Richmond, the capital of Virginia, is a city rich in history. It’s here, in 1775, that Patrick Henry famously declared “Give me liberty or give me death.” And while the extensively renovated Hilton Richmond Downtown can’t trace its roots back quite that far, it is housed in the historic former Miller & Rhoads department store, which dates back to the end of the 19th century. 

 

Every planner wants to create experiences that make meeting attendees feel they’re on top of the world. If you’re planning a meeting in northwest North Carolina, you can achieve that with a visit to Grandfather Mountain. Soaring 5,946 feet and estimated to be 300 million years old, with some rock formations dating back 1.2 billion years, the peak off the Blue Ridge Parkway near Blowing Rock, is accessible by vehicle and by a paved road.