• Detroit’s Cobo Center Awards Naming Rights to Chemical Bank

     
    POSTED February 27, 2019
     

In an unprecedented move, The Detroit Regional Convention Facility Authority (DRCFA) has awarded the naming rights of Cobo Center to Chemical Bank, the largest bank headquartered in Michigan. Chemical Bank and the DRCFA will announce the new name of the convention center by the end of 2019; the name will remain Cobo Center until that time. Chemical Bank was selected to receive naming rights after an extensive competitive process.

“Our announcement gives us all an important message: that public-private partnerships work, and that we continue to dedicate ourselves to serving the customers of this great Center and to the rebuilding of a truly great American city,” says Larry Alexander, Chairman of the DRCFA and President and CEO of the Detroit Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau. “There could not be a better partner than Chemical Bank.” 

The DRCFA has worked diligently to ensure the current Cobo Center is a financially self-sustaining facility by 2024. The DRCFA is currently ahead of schedule and has saved the state’s taxpayers an estimated $74.7 million since its inception in 2009. The naming rights initiative for the convention center has been a longtime goal of the DRCFA. Michigan taxpayers will receive significant benefit in sponsorship revenue to offset the cost of operating the convention center. 

Chemical Financial Corporation recently announced its merger with TCF Financial Corporation, which will be headquartered in a new 20-story building in downtown Detroit. The combined holding company and bank will operate under the TCF name and brand following the closing of the merger. The merger is expected to close in the late third or early fourth quarter of 2019. 

Remote working has become mainstream with the continued presence of COVID-19. While many people have welcomed the new normal of working from home, others miss the separation of spaces, as many corporate offices have remained closed since March. Without the daily obligation to go into the office, professionals have the ability to travel more freely. Hotels across the country are creating “work from hotel” deals–a play on “work from home”–so people can explore new places while still fitting in their 9 to 5.  

 

Choosing a career in the event industry is not for the faint of heart. Let’s face it: Event planning is stressful. The last-minute changes, demands from clients and surmounting urgency of a quickly approaching event can make it difficult to maintain a healthy work-life balance.

As a new mother, I’m right there with you and need just as much help developing a healthy work-life balance. In my experiences working in events, I’ve found the following to be helpful ways to care for my mental health, despite being in a stressful profession:

 

In light of COVID-19, a survey commissioned by the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) discovered that 44 percent of Americans are planning leisure trips or overnight travel before the end of 2020.