• Event Snapshots: Hospitality Fest

     
    FROM THE Winter 2019 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: Hospitality Fest

     
    FROM THE Winter 2019 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: Hospitality Fest

     
    FROM THE Winter 2019 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: Hospitality Fest

     
    FROM THE Winter 2019 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: Hospitality Fest

     
    FROM THE Winter 2019 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: Hospitality Fest

     
    FROM THE Winter 2019 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: Hospitality Fest

     
    FROM THE Winter 2019 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: Hospitality Fest

     
    FROM THE Winter 2019 ISSUE
     
  • Event Snapshots: Hospitality Fest

     
    FROM THE Winter 2019 ISSUE
     

Lucky Strike served as the host venue for the third-annual Hospitality Fest, which gathered more than 750 meeting and event planning professionals for a four-hour evening event. With the goal of spotlighting options across Chicagoland for holiday parties, 74 table sponsors showcased ideas for F&B, event spaces and corporate activities. The teams and volunteers wore bowling shirts with presenting title sponsors’ names on the front to create a fun, laidback atmosphere. Hospitality Fest also included several 20-minute TED Talk-like education sessions on topics like customer service, branding and mentoring. The event was organized by Jim Grillo, CMP, who founded Hospitality Fest to replace the Here’s Chicago Meeting & Event Industry’s End of Summer Bash.

For its September 2019 meeting, the National Association for Catering and Events (NACE) Philadelphia Chapter—which serves industry professionals in the Greater Philadelphia, South Jersey and Delaware region—thought it would try something different. Instead of focusing on the visual presentation of food, organizers took away the sense of sight entirely, outfitting diners with a blindfold at dinner.
 

 

From May 1 to July 14, Philadelphians were enthralled by Chinese culture at the 4th annual Philadelphia Chinese Lantern Festival held in historic Franklin Square. Attendees witnessed 27 lantern displays that were larger than life and made of more than 2,000 lit sculptures and 20,000 LED lights.