Built at the turn of the 20th century, Mattie’s at Green Pastures was once the estate of Henry and Martha “Mattie” Miner Faulk. In 1946, Faulk’s daughter Mary and Mary’s husband Chester Koock opened the fine dining restaurant Green Pastures at the address, and over the years, they hosted lavish parties and grand occasions for celebrities, governors and visiting dignitaries. Mary Koock also catered many parties at the Lyndon B. Johnson Ranch. Although Green Pastures was founded in the era of Jim Crow laws, from the outset, the couple welcomed all guests, regardless of race or religion, long before the Civil Rights Act of the ’60s desegregated other Austin establishments. 

Renovated and restored in 2017, Mattie's at Green Pastures has several spaces for private groups and offers complimentary A/V, customizable menus and valet services. For conferences and holiday parties, the Marion Hall & The Pavilion features 3,500 square feet of versatile space with indoor and outdoor seating for up to 240 guests. Intimate luncheons or executive dinners are popular gatherings in the private dining room, Table Royale, which can host up to 12 guests and includes a private entrance. And the Lounge Room, which can be divided into two to three sections, offers two dining areas and a private bar, and seats up to 32 guests with views of Green Pastures’ heritage oak canopy.

Throughout the restaurant, the space tells the family’s story through family artifacts, and the restaurant still offers some of the family’s beloved recipes on the menu, including its iconic 1965 Milk Punch.

Want to add a literary flavor to your next event–literally? Host a gathering at a library to add a scholarly tone to your fête. You could even go all-in with a literature-themed dress code. Here are some suggestions for a “novel” approach to event planning.

Houston
Houston Public Library

 

Event professionals are constantly thinking about how to best stimulate our guests’ senses in order to create the most memorable experience and greatest impact, whether it’s a wedding, corporate meeting or event, fundraiser or social gathering. Many people focus on only three of the five senses: taste, sight and sound. Rarely do planners pay attention to touch or smell. Strategically paying attention to scent and how it interacts with other sensory experiences can greatly impact the overall quality of an event.

 

Teresa Preza first came to Sugar Land 14 years ago while pursuing a job in event management. Today, she’s assistant director of economic development for the city. Here are some of her reasons for calling Sugar Land her “home sweet home.”

TXM+E: What do you love about living in Sugar Land?