• Flashback: Smith Tower is a Seattle Icon

    Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

     
    POSTED July 30, 2019
     

On July 4, 105 years ago, Seattle’s Smith Tower first opened to the public. On that day, more than 4,000 people paid 25 cents to ride the elevator to the 35th-floor observatory (in the same Otis elevator in operation today, by the way). The tower included 540 offices, six stores, two telegraph offices and a public telephone station.

Today, Smith Tower offers a historical backdrop for private events of up to 80 guests. Choose from two spaces: the 35th-floor bar named The Observatory (of course), or the 22nd-floor Lookout Lounge and deck. On the 35th floor, you’ll also find the tower’s famed “Wishing Chair,” which was rumored to have been gifted to the tower’s original owner and namesake, L.C. Smith, by China’s Empress Dowager Cixi. Legend has it that if you sit in the chair and you’re single, you’ll be married within the year.

The tower can also be a fun afternoon excursion for your group through its Talking Tower Tours. Seeing as its past includes connections to infamous rum-running radio hosts and a one-armed parachuting stuntman, there’s plenty for your guests to talk about long after the tour has ended.

Napa Valley’s Meritage Resort & Spa recently debuted a new program designed to help groups gathering at the resort achieve more “Mindful Meetings.” The program, offered in partnership with Bare Health, can be custom tailored for groups and includes the following wellness-focused activities: meditation, yoga in the vineyard, sound healing, and the creation of juices, smoothies and morning elixirs at the resort’s brand-new Food & Wine Center.

 

After continually hearing that meeting planners were looking to infuse more health, wellness and sustainability into their agendas, Hilton Hotels & Resorts created Meet with Purpose in 2015. As it has evolved, the turnkey program—and its focus on Mindful Eating, Mindful Meeting and Mindful Being—has been increasingly customized to reflect each hotel and each meeting.

 

The Twin Cities’ culinary scene is more diverse than ever.