The Civil War may be the first thing that comes to one’s mind when thinking of Gettysburg, but a close second should be the food offerings available to the nearly 3.7 million visitors and thousands of meeting and conference attendees each year.

“Food is at the heart of all great meetings and conferences,” says Norris Flowers, president, Destination Gettysburg. “Destinations around the country aren’t just looking at food as simply meals that meeting attendees need, but rather experiences that are sometimes at the very core of their conference itself.”

Nestled in Adams County, the area has always had an abundance of options, but as of late, the more food-related tourism options have popped up. Visitors can peruse orchards, farmers markets and vineyards. Additionally, restaurants have started using local ingredients.

Two wineries have opened their doors in which meeting planners can advise attendees to visit. The opening of both was likely bolstered by the creation of the Gettysburg Wine & Fruit Trail, a collection of orchards, markets and wineries in the area. There is also a Savor Gettysburg Food Tour, a Savory Sweets Tour and a Gettysburg Wine, Cider and Dine Tour.

With all of the new tourism options, Destination Gettysburg has ramped up its marketing tactics, showing off the culinary experience as well as the area’s history and heritage.

“What’s most exciting about this development is that it defines our destination in its entirety—not just Gettysburg, not just the battlefield, but Adams County as a full experience,” says Jenny McConnell, sales director, Destination Gettysburg. “This experience is bringing meeting planners from their conference rooms into the farms, wineries and restaurants in several communities that surround Gettysburg, and that’s a victory for us all.”

According to the city's chamber of commerce, Amarillo – which is Spanish for "yellow" – earned its name from the color of the subsoil of Amarillo Creek and the flowers of the area's yucca plants. The Texas Panhandle city is at the crossroads of the desert and southern plains, as well as a tenacious ranching lifestyle and a creative urban vibe. Here, you'll find the wild beauty of the Palo Duro Canyon and the quirky artistry of Cadillac Ranch.

 

In 1929, when a forward-thinking Ketchum, Idaho, businessman named Carl E. Brandt pumped water from the nearby Guyer Hot Springs into a large natatorium and surrounded it with 31 cabins, he created one of the earliest resorts in the state. Six years later, the Union Pacific Railroad purchased 4,300 acres and founded the Sun Valley Ski Resort. 

 

What's the first word that comes to mind when you think of Traverse City? Beautiful. Fun. Adventure. Perfect? That last one might seem hard to attain, but when it comes to a destination for meetings, Traverse City is second to none. It really has it all—world-class conference facilities, outdoor activities to connect your attendees, farm-to-table cuisine and breweries and wineries to tempt every palate.