• Go from Grain to Glass at Stoll and Wolfe Distillery

     
    POSTED October 2, 2018
     

    Enjoy Customized Craft Cocktail and Catering Menus

At Stoll and Wolfe Distillery in Lititz, event guests can take private tours of the facility and enjoy customized craft cocktail and catering menus in the 1,500-square-foot tasting room. On the hour-long tour, guests learn about grain to glass production and have the opportunity to taste three different spirits. A single tour group can accommodate up to 50 guests. 

“People like seeing the methods of production and then getting to try the product,” says co-owner Avianna Wolfe. 

Wolfe and her husband Erik own the facility along with master distiller Dick Stoll. Before delving into the world of distilling, Wolfe owned her own catering business in New York City. She used her experience to create both a regular snack menu of meat and cheese plates, paninis, olives, nuts and pickles for the tasting room and customized F&B menus for private events. 

The tasting room, which functions as the distillery’s main event space, can be reserved for private events of up to 70 guests. The space has accommodated a variety of events in the eight months it has been open, including private dinners, corporate team-building meetings, rehearsal dinners and birthday parties. The distillery’s outdoor patio can also function as private event space when the weather permits. 

The CDC defines close contact as within six feet or less, for 15 minutes or more with someone who tests positive for COVID-19. At gatherings of many kinds, contact tracing is used to trace the people that someone has come into contact with, before they learn that they have tested positive. This allows the people that the sick person came into contact with to be aware of the situation, and to make health-informed choices. 

 

In 2020, Houston First Corp. (HFC) reported that the city was slated to host 252 meetings and 611,000 room nights. By March 14, the Bayou City had already hosted 115 conventions and 137,400 room nights. Then the pandemic hit, and meetings and events across the country came to a screeching halt.

We asked Michael Heckman, acting president and CEO of Houston First Corp. (HFC) how the health crisis has influenced the organization’s business model moving forward.

 

Chances are, you won’t know you’re living through history until it’s too late. It’s already happening. A chain reaction has been set in motion and the ground has begun to slide beneath your feet.

This past year has been a whirlwind to say the least. As a global pandemic sent the world reeling, planners were left grasping for footholds as the event industry was brought to a standstill, and many of the most fundamental elements of live meetings and events were cast in a new light.