• Grasp Strong Communication Skills

     
    POSTED December 4, 2015
     

Communication—be it face-to-face, over the phone, via email or any other version—is and always will be a crucial skillset both in your career and your personal life. Thus, understanding the ways in which to communicate best is crucial. Below, find four signs that prove you need to improve upon the vital skill of communication.

  • Avoiding certain topics. Fear of controversy is common among many people, but it’s something that needs to be faced head on—everyone has a different viewpoint and problems won’t be solved either with silence or passive aggression. Learn to share information and tell the truth without the fear of conflict. This will help you build trust and credibility with your coworkers.
  • Losing control of your emotions. Everyone has emotions—happiness, anger, sadness, you name it. But you can’t overreact to every situation; people will learn to avoid you, and it will be tough to be taken seriously. Work on controlling your emotions to maintain your equilibrium in any situation.
  • Confusion of change through those around you. If those in your personal and professional life complain they don’t know what going on or why something is happening, it’s likely you’re not doing a good job of communicating. Strive to keep people updated with need-to-know information.
  • Not understanding bad news. When you receive bad news last minute or realize people are hiding information from you, it could be because you’re a bad listener. Focus on others, and don’t be thinking about your response while they are talking. Ask questions and don’t interrupt anyone.  

—Adapted from October 2015 issue of Communication Solutions

The times they are a-changing, and that has never been truer than when it comes to selecting an A/V partner and deciding whether the in- house A/V vendor or an outside third-party provider is the right partner for you. Due to advancements in technology, lighting and other A/V equipment that has come down in price, planners are now finding op- portunities to use previously out of budget technology with a much more palatable price tag. 

 

Retreats and off-site meetings present wonderful opportunities for groups to collaborate, strategize and build relationships away from their normal office environments. With proper planning, these sessions can be highly effective and even pivotal in setting a new direction. However, off-sites may present some unforeseen challenges that can quickly deflate the energy in the room if not anticipated and addressed in advance.

 

Landing a big-name keynote speaker can be a significant part of your conference budget. That person should add credibility to the event and hopefully boost attendance. But if your speakers just deliver canned presentations before making a quick exit for the airport, you and your attendees are missing the full value they can bring to an event. With some extra planning, you can help set up the speaker and your event for success.