• Iconic Ames Boston Hotel Adds All-New Meeting & Event Spaces

     
    POSTED April 10, 2017
     

The Ames Boston Hotel has revealed its 1,700 square feet of all-new meeting and event space.

Located on the second floor, the two new spaces include Ames and Oliver & Oakes; they fit groups up to 125 people and feature a design inspired by American manufacturing, uniformity and ingenuity. They were designed by New York City-based architecture and design firm Glen and Co. Architecture.

On a seperate note, the hotel has announced that Chef Mary Dumont will offer customized catering menus for the meeting spaces. She also is opening a restaurant, Cultivar, later this year.

Ames Boston Hotel’s is also undergoing multi-million dollar renovation, which is slated for completion in spring 2017.

“The Ames Building is one of Boston’s most treasured structures, and I’m very pleased to introduce Ames and Oliver & Oakes as the city’s newest meeting and event space,” says Trish Berry, general manager. “We are now uniquely positioned to host intimate gatherings and large corporate affairs in a fully modernized, yet historic space, which offers incredible views of downtown Boston and the Old State House, paired with a truly chef-driven culinary experience.”

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It is almost event day. You are excited, but you are also stressed.

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Everybody loves to talk about welcoming change. Then change happens, and whew, it’s tough. After the past few years, meetings and events professionals certainly appreciate that feeling, but they’re also feeling energized by so many new ways for attendees to gather. 

 

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