• Incentive Trips for Adventurers

     
    POSTED April 10, 2019
     

Planning trips that are distinct can help inspire top performances and loyalty. Grand American Adventures, which specializes in small group excursions for 35- to 65-yearolds, has launched a series of in-depth, guided tours in the Mountain West that also can work well for incentive trips. The excursions feature an element of luxury and accommodations in upscale boutique lodges, ranches, yurts and cabins.

On Canyon Country in Utah – Canyoneering, Hummer touring, mountain biking, floating the Colorado River. Departures: April to October

Winter Wildlife in Wyoming – Snowshoeing and tracking wolves, elk, bighorn sheep and more. Departures: January

Alaska and Kenai In-Depth Tour – Watching wildlife from kayaks and hiking across glaciers and ice fields. Departures: June to September

Yellowstone and Teton In-Depth Tour – Exploring and tracking wildlife in Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park. Departures: June to September

Results from the Incentive Research Foundation’s (IRF) 2022 Incentive Travel Destination Preferences & Their Impact on Motivation confirmed that interest in incentive travel as a motivating sales reward is at an all-time high. 91% of 405 survey respondents described group incentive travel as extremely or very motivating compared to 80% last year. Individual incentive travel was rated even higher as a motivational award at 96% versus 84% last year. 

 

The CDC defines close contact as within six feet or less, for 15 minutes or more with someone who tests positive for COVID-19. At gatherings of many kinds, contact tracing is used to trace the people that someone has come into contact with, before they learn that they have tested positive. This allows the people that the sick person came into contact with to be aware of the situation, and to make health-informed choices. 

 

In 2020, Houston First Corp. (HFC) reported that the city was slated to host 252 meetings and 611,000 room nights. By March 14, the Bayou City had already hosted 115 conventions and 137,400 room nights. Then the pandemic hit, and meetings and events across the country came to a screeching halt.

We asked Michael Heckman, acting president and CEO of Houston First Corp. (HFC) how the health crisis has influenced the organization’s business model moving forward.