• Instagram Inspiration

     
    POSTED April 2, 2015
     

Just as writers experience the dreaded writer’s block, event planners, too, can get stuck in a rut. The Internet is a great place for sparking ideas, but options are limitless. How does one find inspiration with so many different things to search? Pinterest is a classic go-to, but Instagram might be the stronger choice. Instead of scrolling through an endless amount of pictures—some relevant and others completely useless—following someone you admire will give you more successful ideas you can incorporate into your events. We’ve listed a few accounts that boast exceptional ideas.

prestonrbailey Preston Bailey—an extremely talented planner with a celebrity client list—posts pictures that make us swoon.  His transformation photos that show how he decorated a venue our are favorite, but the close-ups of bouquets, tablescapes and décor items also stand out.

thepartygoddess Marley Majcher definitely lives up to her name. The veteran event planner and author has planned major celebrity events and appeared on a number of television shows doling out advice. Her food pictures are droolworthy and the motivational quotes she posts make us think outside the box.

mindyweiss Mindy Weiss’ event photos run the gamut from spectacular weddings to graffiti-themed birthday parties. Her décor ideas and stunning venue pictures will give you just the inspiration you’re looking for.  

thestyleco This Australian-based team of event designers posts every aspect of planning from the behind-the-scenes work to the final product. Their clean, classic look is a must for brainstorming your next event.

And you can’t forget…us!

meetingseventsmags Our team posts photos of industry events we attend and venues we’ve toured. Follow us for tasty treats, standout venues and inspiration.  

The CDC defines close contact as within six feet or less, for 15 minutes or more with someone who tests positive for COVID-19. At gatherings of many kinds, contact tracing is used to trace the people that someone has come into contact with, before they learn that they have tested positive. This allows the people that the sick person came into contact with to be aware of the situation, and to make health-informed choices. 

 

In 2020, Houston First Corp. (HFC) reported that the city was slated to host 252 meetings and 611,000 room nights. By March 14, the Bayou City had already hosted 115 conventions and 137,400 room nights. Then the pandemic hit, and meetings and events across the country came to a screeching halt.

We asked Michael Heckman, acting president and CEO of Houston First Corp. (HFC) how the health crisis has influenced the organization’s business model moving forward.

 

Chances are, you won’t know you’re living through history until it’s too late. It’s already happening. A chain reaction has been set in motion and the ground has begun to slide beneath your feet.

This past year has been a whirlwind to say the least. As a global pandemic sent the world reeling, planners were left grasping for footholds as the event industry was brought to a standstill, and many of the most fundamental elements of live meetings and events were cast in a new light.