• KidZania: Where Kids Can Play at Work

     
    POSTED April 14, 2020
     

If you’re headed to the Dallas area for a family-friendly group outing or conference, you will definitely want to check out Frisco’s newest attraction: KidZania. The 80,000-square-foot experiential learning space allows kids to explore the everyday workdays of firefighters, construction workers, journalists, fashion designers and more.

In the KidZania city, there are child-sized destinations, such as a hospital, police station, supermarket, radio station and theater. Kids can role-play in realistic simulations, such as fighting fires, piloting airplanes, acting in plays, designing robots, performing surgery and going on secret missions. Each KidZania is tailored to the city in which it’s located, complete with buildings, paved streets, vehicles and an economy fueled by a currency called KidZos. The Frisco location is the first in the U.S.

Event planners often prepare for the worst, but one thing they likely didn’t anticipate was a global pandemic when selecting event cancellation insurance policies for their 2020 gatherings. Panicked planners began contacting Marcia McKinney, owner of Northeast Insurance Advisors, in late February and early March, but as meetings and events ground to a halt, they were already out of luck.

“It’s kind of like trying to buy homeowner’s insurance as your house is starting to catch fire... it’s too late,” says McKinney.

 

Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth is one of six recipients of the James Beard Foundation’s 2020 America’s Classics Award, which is given to locally owned restaurants that have timeless appeal and are beloved regionally for quality food that reflects the character of their community. Per the foundation, “Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth, a chicken dinner behemoth positioned between Detroit and Michigan’s summer lake destination, is decidedly on the beaten path. William Zehnder Sr. and his wife, Emilie, bought a former hotel in 1928.

 

In early April Detroit’s TCF Center became a 1,000-bed alternate care site to help ease the burden on local hospitals during the COVID-19 crisis. The 723,000-square-foot facility became the TCF Regional Care Center. According to Pure Michigan’s Michelle Grinnell, who serves as public information officer for the state’s alternate care sites, 39 patients were treated at TCF, the last of whom was discharged on May 7.