• Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board Announce 47.3 Million Visitors

     
    POSTED January 23, 2017
     

According to Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board President & CEO Ernest Wooden Jr., Los Angeles had a record 47.3 million visitors in 2016.

This is the sixth consecutive year they have broken visitation records. The new record is 1.7 million visitors higher than 2015’s total—an increase of 3.8 percent from the previous year.

"Tourism is booming in Los Angeles, and it's helping to drive our whole city's economy forward," says Mayor Garcetti. "My goal is to welcome 50 million tourists to our city by 2020, and new attractions like the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art will have even more people from around the world lining up to come to L.A."

Domestic visitation reached 40.2 million, a 3.8 percent increase from 2015 and 7.1 million international visitors, up 3.5 percent from last year. Los Angeles became the first U.S. destination to have more than 1 million tourists from China. China makes up 75 percent of Los Angeles’ international growth. India was Los Angeles’ second-fastest growing international market; it increased at 10.2 percent from last year.

Los Angeles County’s average occupancy rate for 2016 reached 81.3 percent and a record 29.2 million hotel room nights were sold countywide. Tourism is the largest contributor to the Los Angeles economy and supports an average of more than 500,000 jobs in the leisure sector last year.

“Global desire for the Los Angeles experience is at an all-time high, a fact largely attributable to our city’s celebration of diversity and creativity, from which thriving culinary, cultural and lifestyle scenes have emerged,” says Wooden. “Fantastic new hotels are opening their doors with frequency, chefs are exploring innovative creative territories, noteworthy cultural institutions are choosing to call L.A. home and people want to be a part of the L.A. lifestyle.”

Even during a worldwide pandemic, the hospitality industry is working to make people feel at ease. Though many hotels can only open their doors to health care workers and first responders, they’re reaching out to their local communities with bright messages in clever, socially-distanced ways. Through the heart-shaped lighting of windows at night, hotels are serving as beacons of hope in cities across the country. 

 

Daily life has been significantly altered by COVID-19, no matter the industry. Many are working from home, while children stay inside for online schooling. Meetings and events have been hit especially hard, since the essence of the industry is face-to-face interactions. While we continue to self-isolate, plenty of organizations have been offering webinars with insights on how to handle the pandemic—watching webinars is a great way to use that extra time you might have used for your commute to learn something useful.

 

As the spread of the novel coronavirus continues to put immense pressure on the U.S. health care system and the people who keep it running, the American Hotel and Lodging Association is working to connect hotels with health workers who are struggling to find housing.