• Meet Beth Koenig, Pennsylvania's Wonder Woman

     
    POSTED November 21, 2017
     

    Beth Koenig takes dedication to a whole new level.

At 4 a.m., most people are lying peacefully in bed with at least a couple of hours left to snooze. At 4 a.m., Beth Koenig, president at Brass Tacks Events PHL, has already started her day and is up working and sending emails. She sleeps only about five hours a night, leaves for work at 6 a.m., comes home and then gets back to even more work. 

“I have an extra pack of toothpicks to hold my eyelids up most of the day, but it all works out in the long run,” she says. “The busier I am, and the more stressed I am, the better I do in business.”

Koenig spent 17 years in catering before leaving to take a breather in 2016. Turns out that break was short lived— she opened her wedding and event company just a few months after stepping away from her job.

“I took a sabbatical from catering because I worked all of the time,” she says. “Now, I’m kind of right back into it.”

As if running a less-than-one-year-old company wasn’t enough, Koenig also took on the position of director of events for the Schulson Collective restaurant group in February 2017 and is the presidentelect of ILEA, an organization she credits for helping grow her professional career.

With so many responsibilities and plates in the air, it’s clear that Koenig enjoys what she’s doing—you don’t spend 15-plus hours a day doing something you hate. She’s been in the industry since high school, having worked for her local country club, then later majored in hotel restaurant management at Penn State. It’s almost as though meeting and event planning is in her blood. If anything, it’s definitely a part of her personality. 

“I’m very type A and I like organization, so I thrive on planning events for people and keeping them organized,” she says. “Every day brings new challenges, and when you overcome those challenges, you feel good about yourself.” 

Event planning and experience design go hand in hand. Just ask Maria Moyano, experience designer for the Museum of Ice Cream (MOIC), based in NYC. “I think that everything is an event. You can go have coffee, and that’s an event. Everything is also an experience. You feel happy, and that’s an experience. It’s about what you are trying to get out of the event—and then how does an experience elevate it,” says Moyano.

 

In the midst of the pandemic last year, Loris Menfi joined San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter and Riverwalk as general manager. At the time of her hire, Rivercenter had recently unveiled a renovation to its 70,000-plus square feet of meeting space.

 

Dorothy Hecht was just 16 years old in 1937 when she waited on her first table at what was then Fischer’s Restaurant in downtown Frankenmuth, and ecstatically earned her first 25-cent tip. When she met and eventually married William “Tiny” Zehnder, whose family owned Zehnder’s Restaurant across the street, her happiness continued, and a legacy began.