• Meetings in LA Rise to New Heights

     
    FROM THE Fall 2016 ISSUE
     

    Downtown Los Angeles Offers a Bird's-Eye View on Gatherings

A Los Angeles skyscraper’s just-opened observation terrace and a new elevated restaurant are giving residents and visitors to the City of Angels a glimpse of the heavens.

In June, observation terraces and a glass slide—the Skyslide—opened atop the U.S. Bank Tower, the tallest building and event space on the West Coast (until the 1,100-foot Wilshire Grand Center opens in 2017). Called OUE Skyspace LA, the multilevel attraction gives visitors a view from nearly 1,000 feet above downtown Los Angeles.

Two glass-walled, open-air observation terraces provide 360-degree views of the city below and can hold up to 900 people. Interactive exhibits on Level 54 feature an HD time-lapse of Los Angeles, Infinity Mirror, Shadow Wall and more. For an additional thrill (and cost), ride Skyslide, a 45-foot glass chute bolted outside floors 70 to 69.

At Skyspace, groups are entitled to a priority entry, discounted admission and 20 percent off at the gift store, plus a Skyspace drawstring bag. Starting rates for group admission (minimum 15 people) begin at $19 per person; $25 including the Skyslide; $29 for flex group admission; $35 including the Skyslide. Groups also have a dedicated sales associate to help organize purchases and admission, says Brian Jemison, director, sales and marketing.

If the heights make your group hungry, grab-and-go sandwiches and snacks are sold on-site; catering can be arranged, too. Separately, sophisticated seated dining is available at the new 71Above restaurant. The fine dining restaurant on the 71st floor of the tower offers groups of 14 to 30 people sky-high views during lunch or dinners in private and semiprivate rooms, and cocktail receptions for up to 75 guests. 

With meetings returning to normal as the COVID-19 pandemic levels out, outdoor mountain pursuits are finding more time on meeting agendas. Taking events outdoors not only boosts attendees’ comfort level as they ease back into in-person meetings, time spent in nature is proven to improve brain health and stimulate creative thinking as well.

We’ll be looking at this topic in-depth in the Spring/Summer 2022 issue of Mountain Meetings. Consider this as an introduction to some of the possibilities.  

 

Richmond, the capital of Virginia, is a city rich in history. It’s here, in 1775, that Patrick Henry famously declared “Give me liberty or give me death.” And while the extensively renovated Hilton Richmond Downtown can’t trace its roots back quite that far, it is housed in the historic former Miller & Rhoads department store, which dates back to the end of the 19th century. 

 

Every planner wants to create experiences that make meeting attendees feel they’re on top of the world. If you’re planning a meeting in northwest North Carolina, you can achieve that with a visit to Grandfather Mountain. Soaring 5,946 feet and estimated to be 300 million years old, with some rock formations dating back 1.2 billion years, the peak off the Blue Ridge Parkway near Blowing Rock, is accessible by vehicle and by a paved road.