• Nancy's Fancy brings gelato to caterers

     
    POSTED February 29, 2016
     

Ready your spoons for Butterscotch Budino with Caramel Rosemary Swirl, Coconut Stracciatella with Bittersweet Chocolate Strands or Spiced Stumptown Coffee with Cracked Cocoa Nibs. If the flavors of Nancy’s Fancy Gelato & Sorbetto Artigianale sound like a fancy restaurant dessert, that’s because they’re the new product line from Nancy Silverton, the acclaimed Los Angeles chef, cookbook author and famed co-founder of the restaurants Mozza, Campanile and La Brea Bakery.

Launched this spring in $11 to $13 pint sizes in supermarkets like Gelson’s, Silverton is now offering her ultrapremium gelato and sorbetto in gallon tubs for the catering market. (Tip: You’ll get a reduced price of $45.32 a gallon if you order directly from Nancy Fancy’s with a minimum order of $150.) The line includes seven flavors, two are vegan.

“True Italian gelato is not about an infinite variety of over-the-top, crazy flavors,” says Silverton. “It’s about balance and mouth-feel, creamy, voluptuous texture and pure, honest flavor.”

Event planners often prepare for the worst, but one thing they likely didn’t anticipate was a global pandemic when selecting event cancellation insurance policies for their 2020 gatherings. Panicked planners began contacting Marcia McKinney, owner of Northeast Insurance Advisors, in late February and early March, but as meetings and events ground to a halt, they were already out of luck.

“It’s kind of like trying to buy homeowner’s insurance as your house is starting to catch fire... it’s too late,” says McKinney.

 

Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth is one of six recipients of the James Beard Foundation’s 2020 America’s Classics Award, which is given to locally owned restaurants that have timeless appeal and are beloved regionally for quality food that reflects the character of their community. Per the foundation, “Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth, a chicken dinner behemoth positioned between Detroit and Michigan’s summer lake destination, is decidedly on the beaten path. William Zehnder Sr. and his wife, Emilie, bought a former hotel in 1928.

 

In early April Detroit’s TCF Center became a 1,000-bed alternate care site to help ease the burden on local hospitals during the COVID-19 crisis. The 723,000-square-foot facility became the TCF Regional Care Center. According to Pure Michigan’s Michelle Grinnell, who serves as public information officer for the state’s alternate care sites, 39 patients were treated at TCF, the last of whom was discharged on May 7.