• New Large Group Games Bring Teams Together

     
    FROM THE Fall 2017 ISSUE
     

    Let the Games Begin

  • New Large Group Games Bring Teams Together

     
    FROM THE Fall 2017 ISSUE
     

    Let the Games Begin

  • New Large Group Games Bring Teams Together

     
    FROM THE Fall 2017 ISSUE
     

    Let the Games Begin

There's a new solution to the collective groan that team-building games sometimes elicit. MeetMax Games was launched as an alternative to icebreakers or group games like trivia, and is designed to get players interacting face-to-face without requiring experience. 

The games are played on a common screen, and can accommodate up to 50 players. Each game is centered around a task that the team collaborates, negotiates, and strategizes to complete. The games are simple to learn and fun to play, and they depend on personal interaction for completion. 

Rikki Tahta, founder of MeetMax Games, has a background working in board games, and admits to loving all types of games. However, “board games can't scale for more than six people, and corporate team-building games are not very good games: They are linear tasks," says Tahta. "What we're doing is quite new because 40 people can all play with each other. Over the course of a game, without thinking about it, you have met 25-30 people and interacted with them."

Games have value in the workplace, and MeetMax Games maximizes a game's team-building potential. "These games are doing two things," explains Tahta. "First of all, it levels the playing field. Everyone is on the same level in a game. Secondly, it gives people a structured focus for the interaction." 

A session usually lasts for one to two hours and will go through four to five games. MeetMax facilitates each event and provides the necessary training and technology for each group. 

The CDC defines close contact as within six feet or less, for 15 minutes or more with someone who tests positive for COVID-19. At gatherings of many kinds, contact tracing is used to trace the people that someone has come into contact with, before they learn that they have tested positive. This allows the people that the sick person came into contact with to be aware of the situation, and to make health-informed choices. 

 

In 2020, Houston First Corp. (HFC) reported that the city was slated to host 252 meetings and 611,000 room nights. By March 14, the Bayou City had already hosted 115 conventions and 137,400 room nights. Then the pandemic hit, and meetings and events across the country came to a screeching halt.

We asked Michael Heckman, acting president and CEO of Houston First Corp. (HFC) how the health crisis has influenced the organization’s business model moving forward.

 

Chances are, you won’t know you’re living through history until it’s too late. It’s already happening. A chain reaction has been set in motion and the ground has begun to slide beneath your feet.

This past year has been a whirlwind to say the least. As a global pandemic sent the world reeling, planners were left grasping for footholds as the event industry was brought to a standstill, and many of the most fundamental elements of live meetings and events were cast in a new light.