• Pharm Table Reinvents Comfort Foods for the Better

     
    POSTED April 14, 2020
     
  • Pharm Table Reinvents Comfort Foods for the Better

     
    POSTED April 14, 2020
     

San Antonio restaurant Pharm Table is dedicated to reinventing comfort foods while eliminating those inflammatory ingredients with chronic health implications, such as dairy, wheat and processed sugar. Chef/owner Elizabeth Johnson promotes a largely plant-based diet, with smaller portions of clean animal proteins. She takes much of her inspiration from the ayurvedic diet.

Ayurveda is the conjugation of two Sanskrit words, meaning “life” (ayus) and “science” (veda). The ayurvedic diet is an anti-inflammatory approach to eating that focuses on a person’s unique constitution. Johnson suggests event planners incorporate the philosophy of ayurveda into group meetings through body, mind and spirit programming. This could include serving foods relevant to each season and the three body types; incorporating exercise activities that promote health and movement; and bringing people outdoors to enjoy some of San Antonio’s treasures, such as its rivers, missions and public art. Pharm Table can help facilitate by customizing activities with local health and wellness professionals.

Event planners often prepare for the worst, but one thing they likely didn’t anticipate was a global pandemic when selecting event cancellation insurance policies for their 2020 gatherings. Panicked planners began contacting Marcia McKinney, owner of Northeast Insurance Advisors, in late February and early March, but as meetings and events ground to a halt, they were already out of luck.

“It’s kind of like trying to buy homeowner’s insurance as your house is starting to catch fire... it’s too late,” says McKinney.

 

Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth is one of six recipients of the James Beard Foundation’s 2020 America’s Classics Award, which is given to locally owned restaurants that have timeless appeal and are beloved regionally for quality food that reflects the character of their community. Per the foundation, “Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth, a chicken dinner behemoth positioned between Detroit and Michigan’s summer lake destination, is decidedly on the beaten path. William Zehnder Sr. and his wife, Emilie, bought a former hotel in 1928.

 

In early April Detroit’s TCF Center became a 1,000-bed alternate care site to help ease the burden on local hospitals during the COVID-19 crisis. The 723,000-square-foot facility became the TCF Regional Care Center. According to Pure Michigan’s Michelle Grinnell, who serves as public information officer for the state’s alternate care sites, 39 patients were treated at TCF, the last of whom was discharged on May 7.