• Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau Hires New Executive Director of Tourism

     
    POSTED January 29, 2017
     

The Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau has announced the appointment of Svetlana Yazovskikh to the position of executive director of tourism. Yazovskikh has been with PHLCVB for nine years; her most recent position was the senior international tourism manager.

“I am extremely pleased that Svetlana has accepted our offer to lead the PHLCVB’s tourism team,” says Julie Coker Graham, president and CEO, PHLCVB. “Her commitment to Philadelphia and our customers is unmatched.”

Yazovskikh began her tenure at the PHCLVB as the international tourism manager, where she was in charge of sales and marketing initiatives for the organization’s many markets. She has been a major factor of the growing overseas visitation to the city.

“I’m honored to be assuming this position at such an exciting time for our city,” says Yazovkikh. “Philadelphia has hosted two global events—a Papal visit and the DNC—that drew media form all around the world.”

On top of overseeing the tourism team, Yazovkikh will be in charge of the activity of seven representation offices: China, Denmark, India, Italy, France, Germany and the UK. She is also in charge of the PHLCVB’s strategic partnerships with Brand USA, Expedia and ESPN International.

Philadelphia welcomed more than 638,300 overseas visitors in 2015, which generated $982 million within the region. Yazovkikh graduated from Temple University with a bachelor’s degree in strategic and organizational communication, public relations. She is also an American Bus Association certified Travel Industry Specialist.

Remote working has become mainstream with the continued presence of COVID-19. While many people have welcomed the new normal of working from home, others miss the separation of spaces, as many corporate offices have remained closed since March. Without the daily obligation to go into the office, professionals have the ability to travel more freely. Hotels across the country are creating “work from hotel” deals–a play on “work from home”–so people can explore new places while still fitting in their 9 to 5.  

 

Choosing a career in the event industry is not for the faint of heart. Let’s face it: Event planning is stressful. The last-minute changes, demands from clients and surmounting urgency of a quickly approaching event can make it difficult to maintain a healthy work-life balance.

As a new mother, I’m right there with you and need just as much help developing a healthy work-life balance. In my experiences working in events, I’ve found the following to be helpful ways to care for my mental health, despite being in a stressful profession:

 

In light of COVID-19, a survey commissioned by the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) discovered that 44 percent of Americans are planning leisure trips or overnight travel before the end of 2020.