A packed summer convention calendar likely resulted in a huge boon for Center City hotels, which saw record hotel occupancy in June.

Overall occupancy peaked at 89.4 percent—the highest monthly occupancy on record. The average daily rate also broke a record, witnessing $212.95, the highest since October 2014. The Government Finance Officers Association, the Biotechnology Industrial Organization convention and the International Society for Technology in Education convention helped grow midweek occupancy.  

The Hilton Philadelphia at Penn’s Landing is just one of the hotels that experienced such stellar business.

“June was a great month for us and for many Center City hotels. The importance of conventions to the hotel industry cannot be stated enough,” says Bill Fitzgerald, general manager of the hotel. “When the convention center is consistently filled is when we thrive, benefitting the more than 65,000 hospitality industry workers in Philadelphia.”

The conventions the Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau booked resulted in 97,208 room nights in June and generated an economic impact of roughly $121 million.

“We are thrilled that our convention and group business has helped secure the highest June hotel occupancy on record,” says Jack Ferguson, president/CEO PHLCVB. "We consistently tout to our convention groups how easily accessible Philadelphia is for their attendees, and with all the national and international buzz about Philadelphia, conventions are drawing higher-than-average attendance. Three of our largest groups this year have broken or nearly broken their attendance records.”

Remote working has become mainstream with the continued presence of COVID-19. While many people have welcomed the new normal of working from home, others miss the separation of spaces, as many corporate offices have remained closed since March. Without the daily obligation to go into the office, professionals have the ability to travel more freely. Hotels across the country are creating “work from hotel” deals–a play on “work from home”–so people can explore new places while still fitting in their 9 to 5.  

 

Choosing a career in the event industry is not for the faint of heart. Let’s face it: Event planning is stressful. The last-minute changes, demands from clients and surmounting urgency of a quickly approaching event can make it difficult to maintain a healthy work-life balance.

As a new mother, I’m right there with you and need just as much help developing a healthy work-life balance. In my experiences working in events, I’ve found the following to be helpful ways to care for my mental health, despite being in a stressful profession:

 

In light of COVID-19, a survey commissioned by the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) discovered that 44 percent of Americans are planning leisure trips or overnight travel before the end of 2020.