• Restaurant Recommendation: elements

     
    FROM THE Spring 2017 ISSUE
     

    Discover haute cuisine in the heart of Princeton.

Scott Anderson may be a rock star in the culinary world (he’s been a semifinalist for best chef in the Mid-Atlantic region for the James Beard awards four times), but if you’re expecting a Gordon Ramsay type with a fiery temper, think again. This mild-mannered chef prefers his food to be the center of attention. Indeed, it is, and elements is widely considered on par with many of New York’s finest restaurants. Settle in for an experience where a cavalcade of artfully plated cuisine is set before you. Choose from a fourcourse dinner, the chef’s tasting menu (with 10-12 courses) or the grand tasting menu (with a whopping 17-22 courses, but don’t worry since they are diminutive). elements is the very essence of haute cuisine and is the answer to every New Jersey planner’s dilemma of finding a place with Manhattan-level dining sans bridge or tunnel traffic. 

Located upstairs from its more casual sister, Mistral, elements has an open kitchen and just nine tables in the main dining room (buyouts of this room are available with room for 50 guests). There are two private rooms (one accommodates 10 guests; the second is suitable for 25) that can be combined to accommodate larger groups. Though elements is only open for dinner, its two rooms, fully A/V equipped, are available for daytime bookings. Four- and five-course lunches are served family-style from Mistral and shuttled upstairs. 

Located upstairs from its more casual sister, Mistral, elements has an open kitchen and just nine tables in the main dining room (buyouts of this room are available with room for 50 guests). There are two private rooms (one accommodates 10 guests; the second is suitable for 25) that can be combined to accommodate larger groups. Though elements is only open for dinner, its two rooms, fully A/V equipped, are available for daytime bookings. Four- and five-course lunches are served family-style from Mistral and shuttled upstairs. 

We've all been there: You’re heading out to lunch with a group of people when someone asks, “What are you hungry for?” Everyone responds at once: “Italian!” “Chinese!” “Sushi!” “I could go for a burger!” Well, now what? Thanks to food halls, you no longer have to choose just one. Here are five food halls across the North- east that will satisfy everyone’s cravings (and possibly serve as your next meeting venue!).

 

Green salad, chicken, two veggies and a starch—that might have been a reasonable meal to serve group attendees in the last century, but it won’t cut it in 2020. Today, guests expect that a growing range of dietary needs will be accommodated, whether they’re eating keto, vegan, paleo, gluten free or some combination of all four. And, in a time when tech employees enjoy gourmet in-house commissaries on the job, it takes some serious culinary pyrotechnics to impress them.

 

The atmosphere at relaxed Avondale neighborhood eatery Pisolino may remind you of a charming, laid-back European bistro—and for good reason.

Chef and co-owner James De Marte spent over a decade cooking his way through Italy to craft and hone the skills on full display at the cozy restaurant today. “The restaurant is truly his dream-turned-reality and a showcase of his love for Italian cuisine,” says co-owner Rachel De Marte.