• SelfEco Reveals New Compostable Line

     
    POSTED August 29, 2016
     

SelfEco recently revealed a new line of disposable, eco-friendly dishes called Compostable without Compromise. The line features more than 20 products with 12 separate designs that will allow event planners to go green in style.

The bioplastic products include a variety of drinkware, catering ware and utensils, which can be used for a range of different events.

“SelfEco has created a line of upscale, attractive and durable disposable service ware that fits great into many event and party themes,” says Connie Weigel, director of purchasing for Kelber Catering, “It is all compostable and perfectly supports our sustainable hospitality practices.”

Adding design and quality to disposable dishware, SelfEco believes event planners shouldn’t sacrifice style or durability in order to be eco-friendly. “Compostable products should be superior to the non-recyclable, disposable products they replace. You should not have to make sacrifices to use them. You should feel proud and excited to use them,” says Danny Mishek, president of SelfEco. “We have transformed compostable party and catering ware from products customers are forced to use to products they want to use because of their quality and appeal.”

Daily life has been significantly altered by COVID-19, no matter the industry. Many are working from home, while children stay inside for online schooling. Meetings and events have been hit especially hard, since the essence of the industry is face-to-face interactions. While we continue to self-isolate, plenty of organizations have been offering webinars with insights on how to handle the pandemic—watching webinars is a great way to use that extra time you might have used for your commute to learn something useful.

 

As the spread of the novel coronavirus continues to put immense pressure on the U.S. health care system and the people who keep it running, the American Hotel and Lodging Association is working to connect hotels with health workers who are struggling to find housing.

 

With the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, most people are working from home. Many are social distancing or quarantining with their children, who have transitioned to online classes. Restaurants, bars, coffee shops, offices, stores and so much more have been temporarily shut down in many states, affecting daily life in the most unexpected of ways.