Hidden Spring Lavender Farm is a hidden gem in Skillman. For owners Steve and Marie Voorhees, growing lavender started off as a passion project to brighten up their fields, but it turned into something much more. 

Six years ago, the Voorhees began growing lavender. They started with only 1,000 plants, but have now expanded to over 5,000. Three years ago, they opened the lavender shop, which became Marie’s full-time job in 2015. The experience, as she says, has been delightful and satisfying.

Unlike other lavender farms in the area, everything at Hidden Spring Lavender Farm is done by hand, from the harvesting to the production. They offer a variety of products, like soaps, lotions, pillows, flower arrangements and gift baskets, at a wide range of prices that are accessible for everyone. 

“A special thing about lavender is that it’s great for calming, soothing and clearing the mind,” says Marie. It also makes for a great corporate gift! Hidden Spring Lavender Farm’s gift baskets are a popular item, and can be customized for any occasion. 

Event planners often prepare for the worst, but one thing they likely didn’t anticipate was a global pandemic when selecting event cancellation insurance policies for their 2020 gatherings. Panicked planners began contacting Marcia McKinney, owner of Northeast Insurance Advisors, in late February and early March, but as meetings and events ground to a halt, they were already out of luck.

“It’s kind of like trying to buy homeowner’s insurance as your house is starting to catch fire... it’s too late,” says McKinney.

 

Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth is one of six recipients of the James Beard Foundation’s 2020 America’s Classics Award, which is given to locally owned restaurants that have timeless appeal and are beloved regionally for quality food that reflects the character of their community. Per the foundation, “Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth, a chicken dinner behemoth positioned between Detroit and Michigan’s summer lake destination, is decidedly on the beaten path. William Zehnder Sr. and his wife, Emilie, bought a former hotel in 1928.

 

In early April Detroit’s TCF Center became a 1,000-bed alternate care site to help ease the burden on local hospitals during the COVID-19 crisis. The 723,000-square-foot facility became the TCF Regional Care Center. According to Pure Michigan’s Michelle Grinnell, who serves as public information officer for the state’s alternate care sites, 39 patients were treated at TCF, the last of whom was discharged on May 7.