After a two-year hiatus from the restaurant world, chef Jason Vincent is back with Giant. The 40-seat spot in Logan Square offers classic Midwestern dishes from the culinary genius named Food & Wine’s “Best New Chef” and a winner of the Michelin Guide’s Bib Gourmand award. General Manager and Partner Josh Perlman will oversee Giant’s beverage program, which includes a boutique wine and beer list and classic cocktails like this one—named after A Tribe Called Quest song.

INGREDIENTS
—1.5 oz. St. George Botanivore Gin
—1 oz. Bonal Gentiane Quina
—1 oz. aperol
—orange twist for garnish

DIRECTIONS
1. Combine all ingredients (in the order listed above) in a large mixing glass with ice cubes.
2. Stir vigorously to chill contents and avoid dilution.
3. Strain into a double old-fashioned glass filled with ice.
4. Garnish with an orange twist.

Courtesy of Giant

As the number of vaccinations across the country increases, the amount of live events and gatherings will hopefully rise with it. However, that doesn’t mean the way people gather will go back to normal instantly: there may be an adjustment period before bars, theaters, stadiums and churches are all full of people again.

 Spacing, social distancing, and creativity will be vital for planners and venues in the meantime, and tools like staging, seating, and more will be crucial for the execution of these.

 

As the number of vaccinations across the country increases, the amount of live events and gatherings will hopefully rise with it. However, that doesn’t mean the way people gather will go back to normal instantly: there may be an adjustment period before bars, theaters, stadiums and churches are all full of people again.

 Spacing, social distancing, and creativity will be vital for planners and venues in the meantime, and tools like staging, seating, and more will be crucial for the execution of these.

 

2020 was on track to be a record year. For some catering companies across the state, continuous growth year-over-year had set them up for success, and they thought it would be their best 365 days yet.

And a record year it was—but not for good reasons. Layoffs and furloughs, major losses in sales, and too many cancellations and postponed events to count made 2020 a year that catering companies will never forget.