• Signature Drink: Gintly Down the Stream

     
    POSTED September 13, 2017
     

INGREDIENTS
— 2 oz. Queen’s Courage Old Tom Gin
— 3 dashes Aromatic Bitters (Hella Bitters is a good substitute however, use only two dashes)
— .25 oz. tonic syrup (Use Tomr’s or honey as a substitute)
— Orange Twist for Garnish

DIRECTIONS
1. In a mixing glass or tin combine the gin, bitters and tonic syrup.
2. Add ice and stir until well chilled.
3. Pour into a well-chilled glass or over large ice cubes/whiskey stones if you have them.
4. Garnish with the peel of an orange.

Restaurant Serenade shares contemporary American fare in a chic setting. Called the “CEO Capital of New Jersey Dining” by Zagat, this restaurant features a private room, the Loft, which accommodates parties and private dining for up to 30 people. The entire restaurant is available for parties of 50 or more. “We have finally switched to almost all house-made ingredients,” says John Jansma, general manager/sommerlier at Restaurant Serenade. “Here we are using our house-made aromatic bitters (Cinchona, Coriander, Black Pepper, Orange Zest, Juniper, Cinnamon) and our house-made tonic syrup (Cinchona, Citric Acid, Lemon, Lime and Orange Zest, Black Pepper, Juniper, Ginger) with an Old Tom (and old style of sweetened gin). This drink is somewhere between and Old Fashioned and a Gin and Tonic served over hand-carved ice (that’s right, I carve the ice by hand a couple times a week).” 

Courtesy of Restaurant Serenade in Chatham

As the number of vaccinations across the country increases, the amount of live events and gatherings will hopefully rise with it. However, that doesn’t mean the way people gather will go back to normal instantly: there may be an adjustment period before bars, theaters, stadiums and churches are all full of people again.

 Spacing, social distancing, and creativity will be vital for planners and venues in the meantime, and tools like staging, seating, and more will be crucial for the execution of these.

 

As the number of vaccinations across the country increases, the amount of live events and gatherings will hopefully rise with it. However, that doesn’t mean the way people gather will go back to normal instantly: there may be an adjustment period before bars, theaters, stadiums and churches are all full of people again.

 Spacing, social distancing, and creativity will be vital for planners and venues in the meantime, and tools like staging, seating, and more will be crucial for the execution of these.

 

2020 was on track to be a record year. For some catering companies across the state, continuous growth year-over-year had set them up for success, and they thought it would be their best 365 days yet.

And a record year it was—but not for good reasons. Layoffs and furloughs, major losses in sales, and too many cancellations and postponed events to count made 2020 a year that catering companies will never forget.