• Survey Results Show Americans Are Slowly Planning to Travel

     
    POSTED July 8, 2020
     

In light of COVID-19, a survey commissioned by the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) discovered that 44 percent of Americans are planning leisure trips or overnight travel before the end of 2020.  

In comparison, 70 percent of Americans plan vacations during a regular year. Due to the pandemic, the public has had to alter those regular travel plans. The survey determined what types of travel people continue to plan, as well as the trips they are interested in taking.  

More people plan to stay with family and friends (43 percent) for overnight trips than to book hotels (39 percent), according to the survey, though 68 percent said they are likely to stay at a hotel within the year.  

Thirty two percent of people traveling plan to purchase plane tickets for a trip, while 72 percent plan to drive by car to their destination. Forty percent of those who plan to drive expect to drive more than four hours away, while 35 percent of people are budgeting for two to four hours of drive time.

Cruises have been put on the back burner, as 57 percent of those surveyed said they are uncomfortable with the thought of staying on a cruise ship. Sixty one percent said they do not plan to board a cruise ship for vacation.  

According to the survey, 75 percent of people believe that traveling can help jumpstart the economy, and 72 percent believe that traveling can help support small businesses. Of course, being safe while going on vacation is vital–it can be done by complying with health codes, state and federal regulations.  

Remote working has become mainstream with the continued presence of COVID-19. While many people have welcomed the new normal of working from home, others miss the separation of spaces, as many corporate offices have remained closed since March. Without the daily obligation to go into the office, professionals have the ability to travel more freely. Hotels across the country are creating “work from hotel” deals–a play on “work from home”–so people can explore new places while still fitting in their 9 to 5.  

 

Choosing a career in the event industry is not for the faint of heart. Let’s face it: Event planning is stressful. The last-minute changes, demands from clients and surmounting urgency of a quickly approaching event can make it difficult to maintain a healthy work-life balance.

As a new mother, I’m right there with you and need just as much help developing a healthy work-life balance. In my experiences working in events, I’ve found the following to be helpful ways to care for my mental health, despite being in a stressful profession:

 

This fall, chef Jorge Guzman will open a new restaurant, Petite León, in the former Blackbird Cafe space in South Minneapolis. The restaurant will serve dishes with Mexican, Spanish, French, and American influences, that aim to be approachable, creative and delicious.