• Tarukino Introduces New Cannabis-Infused Drinks

     
    POSTED April 23, 2018
     

    Seattle Company Offering up a Contact High

Tarukino, a Seattle-based maker of cannabis-infused products, has added six new drinks to its offerings.

"With these new products, we're here to show that when it comes to consuming cannabis, there is a great alternative to smoking," says Howard Lee, CEO of Tarukino Inc. "These products will also show consumers and other cannabis edible makers that quality products can be made without including cannabis smell or taste," says Lee. Tarukino uses its 

Tarukino uses its proprietary SōRSE emulsion technology to infuse cannabis into its products. The new drinks include Happy Apple Diet, a low-calorie version of its Happy Apple product line; Utopia, a zero-calorie sparkling water with natural fruit essences; Vertus, a Champagnestyle drink; Twisted Apple, a sparkling apple drink; and Reeb, a barley soda. In addition, Pearl20 Mini is a flavorless food and drink mixer. The products have been approved by the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board. 

While attending the 2022 Colorado Governor’s Tourism Conference on Sept. 21-23 in Snowmass, presenter Angie Briggs, vice president of industry relations for the U.S. Travel Association, spoke about the state of the tourism industry at the opening session and led a “Getting Candid About Workforce” seminar. During the workforce breakout session, she mentioned U.S. Travel’s Future of Travel Mobility Conference that took place on Sept.

 

The CDC defines close contact as within six feet or less, for 15 minutes or more with someone who tests positive for COVID-19. At gatherings of many kinds, contact tracing is used to trace the people that someone has come into contact with, before they learn that they have tested positive. This allows the people that the sick person came into contact with to be aware of the situation, and to make health-informed choices. 

 

In 2020, Houston First Corp. (HFC) reported that the city was slated to host 252 meetings and 611,000 room nights. By March 14, the Bayou City had already hosted 115 conventions and 137,400 room nights. Then the pandemic hit, and meetings and events across the country came to a screeching halt.

We asked Michael Heckman, acting president and CEO of Houston First Corp. (HFC) how the health crisis has influenced the organization’s business model moving forward.