Tetherow has teamed up with nationally recognized energy healer Bill Turner to offer wellness breakout sessions for groups meeting and staying at the Bend, Oregon, resort. The sessions are held at the resort event pavilion, which includes floor-to-ceiling glass doors framing views of the Cascade Mountains.

Turner has more than 30 years of experience in land, horse and human energy work. Based in Sisters, Oregon, he is also a professional speaker and trainer.

“We have worked with Bill on a number of projects at Tetherow, including breakout sessions for our own employees during company meetings,” says Chris van der Velde, managing partner. “The employees come out of the sessions clearer, more alert and ready to get back to business. Our own experience, along with the increased interest from planners, led us to partner with Bill to create unique breakout sessions meant to increase productivity and create a sense of wellness for our meeting and event guests.”

Groups can choose between two sessions: Am I Breathing? Am I Grounded? Am I Happy? and ChiGong for Health. The former takes participants through simple and engaging exercises that pertain to breathing, grounding and happiness. The goal of the session is for participants to walk away with tools to live a more balanced and productive life.

ChiGong for Health is appropriate for shorter breakout sessions that seek to refresh the mind and body. ChiGong—also spelled Qigong—is meditation through slow, flowing movements and deep, rhythmic breathing. It is said to maintain health, increase stamina, slow the aging process and create a calm mental state. 

Both sessions are $150 per participant. For information, contact director of sales Kristi DiTullio at kditullio@tetherow.com

The CDC defines close contact as within six feet or less, for 15 minutes or more with someone who tests positive for COVID-19. At gatherings of many kinds, contact tracing is used to trace the people that someone has come into contact with, before they learn that they have tested positive. This allows the people that the sick person came into contact with to be aware of the situation, and to make health-informed choices. 

 

In 2020, Houston First Corp. (HFC) reported that the city was slated to host 252 meetings and 611,000 room nights. By March 14, the Bayou City had already hosted 115 conventions and 137,400 room nights. Then the pandemic hit, and meetings and events across the country came to a screeching halt.

We asked Michael Heckman, acting president and CEO of Houston First Corp. (HFC) how the health crisis has influenced the organization’s business model moving forward.

 

Chances are, you won’t know you’re living through history until it’s too late. It’s already happening. A chain reaction has been set in motion and the ground has begun to slide beneath your feet.

This past year has been a whirlwind to say the least. As a global pandemic sent the world reeling, planners were left grasping for footholds as the event industry was brought to a standstill, and many of the most fundamental elements of live meetings and events were cast in a new light.