• Travelers Report Which Safety Protocols are Priorities for Hotel Stays

     
    POSTED August 28, 2020
     

According to a survey commissioned by the American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA), frequent travelers feel safer when hotels adhere to AHLA's Stay Safe guidelines, which detail cleaning protocols for hotels during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The number one priority for frequent travelers is that hotel employees wear face masks, with 87 percent of participants saying that that would make them more comfortable while traveling. 86 percent of participants would prefer to forgo daily housekeeping, and only allowing entry to the room when guests give permission. The lowest priority for frequent travelers–although still agreed on by most participants at 77 percent–is that the pool and gym should be temporarily closed. 

Other conditions surveyed include requiring face masks for guests, implementing transparent barriers between the front desk and guests, signage for PPE and washing hands, and floor markings for social distancing, 

For this survey, AHLA defined "frequent travelers" as people who stay in hotels five nights a year. 

So far, webcams and Zoom meetings have been an essential part of 2020. While digital options are functional placeholders for meetings, chatting with a coworker over Skype doesn’t always set up a team for success. Human connection is vital to team building, and hosting safe, small meetings is a great way to revitalize teams after months of working from home.

 

Through responses to bi-weekly surveys, Global Business Travel Association members have indicated that domestic busines travel is ramping up after months of struggle.  

 

Over the years, any corporate event planner can admit to spending countless hours researching the perfect venue or vendors for their gatherings. After attending or hosting hundreds of events, New York-based Daphne Hoppenot was no stranger to this research and was frustrated by its repetitive nature. However, it was planning her wedding in 2018 that pushed her to realize the lack of resources in the corporate events market compared to the wedding industry, and set out to see if other meetings and events professionals were struggling with the same problem.